M PERFORMANCE: BMW K1100 CAFÉ RACER

M PERFORMANCE: BMW K1100 CAFÉ RACER

Jerem Motorcycles builds a 1093cc BMW Café Racer… 

The BMW K series earned the nickname “Flying Brick” for the unorthodox engine layout, which situated an automotive-inspired inline-four engine flat on its side in the engine chassis.  The heads are visible on one side, the crankshaft on the other — a blocky aesthetic that gave these “Bricks” their name.

In the 1990s, the K100 evolved into the K1100, whose 1092cc engine was the largest ever fitted into a BMW motorcycle at the time, boasting nearly 100 horsepower and 80 ft-lbs of torque. The result was a high-speed cruise missile of a bike, which could run 100 mph all day long.

The BMW K series has always had a uniquely automotive connection. In fact, the original 1977 prototype was built with a PSA-Renault X-Type engine from a Peugeot 104 “supermini” small car. What’s more, the production K100 eschewed traditional Bing carburetors in favor of a Bosch LE-Jetronic fuel injection system similar to that used in BMW’s E30 3 Series cars.

For this reason, it seems especially appropriate to tap the K Series for an M Performance-inspired build — one that applies a bit of the style and performance of the M-badged BMW cars to a Motorrad product. This project is the work of Jeremie Duchampt of France’s Jerem Motorcycles, whose Rothmans-inspired CB750F2 we recently featured.  Given the high level of execution in his builds, it’s crazy to think Jeremie has only been customizing bikes for the last two years — at least professionally — but he’s a born tinkerer who’s always worked on his own vehicles.

This K1100, built for one of Jeremie’s friends, now sports a full Suzuki TL1000S front end swap, which includes forks, wheel, and Tokico brakes. The rear wheel is from a BMW K1200GT, with both rims wrapped in super-sticky Pirelli Super Corsa rubber.

Given the engine layout, the K bikes are known to smoke on their side stands, as oil can creep downward toward the “top” / heads of the engine. So Jeremie modified the stand to work on the right side of the bike — we love this kind of detail, which indicates this bike is intended to be ridden, not just parked in the garage.

As befits an M-inspired build, the bike has been opened with an airbox removal and custom stainless 4-into-1 exhaust, and an aftermarket oil cooler helps keep things cool. The electronics have been completely redone, and then there’s the M-inspired paint, which is the work of Anthony A2F — no vinyl or decals!

BMW K1100 Cafe Racer: Builder Interview

What is the make, model and year of the donor’s bike?

BMW K1100.

Why was this bike built?

The bike was built for a friend.

What was the design concept and what influenced the build?

Retro vintage café racer type.

What custom work was done on this bike?

Chassis:

  • Suzuki 1000 TLS inverted fork
  • Suzuki 1000 TLS front rim with Tokico braking system
  • New needle bearings for the steering
  • Homemade front mudguard
  • Rear rim from BMW 1200 GT
  • New Brembo rear disc and pad
  • Pirelli Super Corsa tires (160/60/17 AR and 120/70/17 AV)
  • YSS gas shock absorber made to measure for height
  • Controls set back foot plates (DP dixer)
  • Custom brake hoses EXACT
  • Custom rear plate holder + mudguard
  • Half handlebars bracelet + CNC handlebar grips
  • Complete cleaning of the cycle part and epoxy painting
  • Modification of the frame to accommodate the custom rear shell
  • Brembo brake master cylinders
  • Stand modification, change of side due to the original problem (oil in the pistons)

Electricals:

  • Vintage yellow LED headlight + custom CNC aluminum brackets
  • Vintage pointed LED tail light
  • LED front turn signals + central turn signal modification
  • LED rear turn signal integrated in the frame
  • LED plate light
  • Solise battery modification of the support
  • Management box for new speedometer cluster (Five Aces Aeon)
  • Aeon digital speedometer from Five Aces
  • Five Aces keyless start system
  • Fuses have been moved to have a BMW M Performance color order
  • Integration of the gasoline and water T° gauges in the bubble.
  • Airbox removed to integrate the horns
  • Removal of the ABS system with modification of the electric harness
  • Calculator moved under the seat
  • Supplies: Grommets, wires, retractable sheaths, ground braid, lugs, Flex clamp

Engine:

  • Removal of the airbox
  • Air filter with modification of the supports
  • Gasket + new tank float
  • New injection pressure regulator
  • Oil recuperator Alu CNC blue
  • Alu water tank
  • Engine covers were painted in vermiculated paint (Ferrari-style cylinder head)
  • Custom stainless exhaust with 4-in-1 with silencer (Leo Vince stickers are fake)
  • Replacement of the various fluids (brakes, engine oil 20w50, coolant, filters)
  • Modified manual choke

Aesthetics:

  • Machining of parts to fit the fork
  • Custom rear shell with integrated rear lights
  • Custom front bubble adapted to the tank (FFPro Design), and windshield cut to give a more crushed effect
  • Custom leather and Alcantara seat with white stitching (Irina: Saddlery point 34)
  • Custom BMW logo for the tank
  • Vintage CNC aluminum tank cap
  • Bright BMW logo integrated in the bubble
  • Vintage CNC mirrors
  • Vintage helmet matching the bike

Paint:

  • White tank and rear shell with M performance deco varnish (no stickers). Done by Anthony A2F
  • Rims epoxy painted RAL 5012
  • Brake calipers gray metal high temperature
  • Frame epoxy black satin
  • Engine, swingarm etc.: Black epoxy satin
  • Upper T, lower T, fork legs, front brake discs — epoxy metal gray

Can you tell us what it’s like to ride this bike?

It’s a very special to ride the BMW K’s, but you get used to it.

Is there anything you did during the build that you are particularly proud of?

The whole bike, but I love the fairings; the lines are great.